Priority the dating of scientific names in ornithology

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It's almost a year since I started blogging for the Museum, and as I considered what I should profile for my 12th Specimen of the Month, I inevitably began to reflect on all the amazing specimens I've already written about, those on my list to write about in the future (which, for various reasons, can't be featured today), as well as all the specimens I've yet to even discover exist here.

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One of the most incredible things about the Museum is just how many specimens we care for.

To describe it by coining a phrase from Charles Darwin (although he was talking about the evolutionary Cambrian explosion, but anyway...), the Museum's collection is full of 'endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful'.So today I thought I would celebrate all the specimens in our collection. As you can obviously gather, not all 80 million are on public display.

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